Tech

Airbnb Slows Hiring Overseas, Shifts Strategy

Fast-Growing Online Rental Service Is Trying Not to Move Too Quickly Abroad

Airbnb Inc. is trying to avoid becoming another cautionary tale in international expansion.

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Airbnb, which is run by CEO Brian Chesky, will centralize certain services in a yet-to-be named European hub.

One of technology’s hottest startups, with a valuation of $2.5 billion, the online-accommodation rental service has recently slowed down hiring in its international operation, according to several people with direct knowledge of the matter.

Airbnb, which has about 600 employees world-wide, has also shifted its strategy abroad. The company is assigning scores of employees to new roles and moving to centralize certain services in a yet-to-be announced European hub, these people added.

As a result, several employees—less than a dozen—have decided to leave the company, the company said. The creation of the hub, which may be set up in Dublin, one person said, will require relocation for some employees. Meanwhile, the changes in responsibilities will also require additional training.

A company spokeswoman confirmed the changes to its international strategy and added that it hasn’t made any layoffs in connection with these changes. She declined to comment on plans for a new European hub.

Pressing on the international brakes might seem counter intuitive for the five-year-old San Francisco based startup—a business that is now more global than domestic. But Airbnb and its chief executive, Brian Chesky, is trying to avoid the pitfalls that have befallen other highflying tech companies, like Groupon Inc., GRPN -1.54% which grew hyper-fast abroad early on but faced major difficulties after going public.

Full Article Here:

Via The WSJ

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Introducing Wired City, a New Channel Where Commercial Real Estate and Broadband Come Together

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New York City is inching ever closer to rival Silicon Valley as the epicenter of the tech world—and commercial real estate has to match its pace. With more tech start-ups moving to New York, and requiring high-speed Internet to do their jobs—or at least watch cat videos with minimal buffering—the presence of a broadband Internet connection can transform a pedestrian property into a hot commodity.

That’s why fellow Observer Media property The Commercial Observer has launched Wired City, a savvy new channel that explores the intersection of infrastructure, real estate, and broadband Internet. If you enjoy Betabeat’s coverage of New York’s quest for world domination, we think Wired City will be right up your alley.

Put simply, broadband Internet means high-speed Internet—in other words, anything that’s not that annoying dial-up connection you had around the dawn of the interwebs. It encompasses everything from DSL—which transmits information at a relatively slow six Mbps—to the much-desired fiber broadband, which transmits information at speeds up to 150 Mbps.

Full Article Here:

Via BetaBeat – The Lowdown on High Tech