NYC

cb976c53-f31a-4628-9e78-7bbb6eb3f3ff

Rental Incentives during peak summer months in NYC? Sounds too good to be true but it’s not.

New York’s prime leasing season is well under way and there are more choices then ever for prospective renters. Typically, from May through August property owners across New York City have the upper hand as college graduates flock to the city in preparation for their new jobs as well as families gearing up to secure a residence before the new school year. Renters in NYC know all too well to expect higher rents during these summer months, and those that find themselves in the cycle of leasing during the summer are usually prepare for sticker shock.
For the first time in almost four years of growth in the NYC real estate market property owners are having to get creative with incentives like paying the broker fee and offering free rent to attract more interested renters. There are more choices in the market now more than previous years because prices are beyond what most people can or will pay for a rental. Renters looking for a new place to call home this summer have a competitive advantage as they can be more choosy in what they put an application in for. People who may not have ideal credit are getting approved much faster than in past as landlords appear to be more willing to work tenants. While incentives are typically neighborhood specific, certain older rental buildings are also competing by offering their own incentives.
As one of the leading boutique firms in the New York Metropolitan Area, NY Living Solutions specializes in helping renters and buyers navigate the Financial District. NY Living Solutions has access to many no-fee apartment rentals all throughout Manhattan including luxury condominiums as well as new grand opening properties with incredible amenities.
785568

Exclusive Coop for Sale Located in the Trendy Columbia University neighborhood

200 West 108th Street, #14a

$1,250,000 FOR SALE
2 beds 2 baths
Property Type: Coop
Maintenance: $1,827
Pet Policy: Case By Case

Located in the Columbia University neighborhood, Pre-war apartment in excellent condition and a spacious layout.(Approx 1250 sf) high-floor with open eastern and northern exposures. Views overlooking Central Park.

Apartment features pre-war details, a windowed kitchen, Large living room, corner master suite, Spacious 2nd bedroom, 2 full windowed bathrooms, high beamed ceilings and great closet space. This coop has a renovated marble lobby, P/T doorman, new elevators, central laundry, and a live-in super

Just a couple of blocks from Central Park and its many attractions,
Located Close to several subway lines (1/2/3/B/C).

7-Eleven Goes High-Tech – FiDi

 7-Eleven has gone high-tech.

New Lower Manhattan 7-Eleven

The chain’s expansive new Financial District outpost, which sits at the corner of John and Pearl streets, boasts touch-screen ordering, free Wi-Fi, a huge flat-screen TV and even an Amazon Locker — a kiosk where Amazon customers can pick up their online-ordered goods.

The new 7-Eleven opened last week —  just in time to celebrate the chain’s annual “Free Slurpee Day” on July 11 — and looks more like a cafe than a convenience store, with enough space to seat about 25 people.

The Stack: NYC First Prefabricated Building

INWOOD — One of the city’s first prefabricated residential building to come to Inwood is near completion.

The Stack, a 38,000-square-foot, seven-story concrete and steel building, was shipped to 4857 Broadway in 56 separate modules. Placement of the modules started in late June and will be completed Wednesday by an eight-person crew and one crane.

Full Article Here:

Via DNAinfo New York

Introducing Wired City, a New Channel Where Commercial Real Estate and Broadband Come Together

wiredcity logo copy

New York City is inching ever closer to rival Silicon Valley as the epicenter of the tech world—and commercial real estate has to match its pace. With more tech start-ups moving to New York, and requiring high-speed Internet to do their jobs—or at least watch cat videos with minimal buffering—the presence of a broadband Internet connection can transform a pedestrian property into a hot commodity.

That’s why fellow Observer Media property The Commercial Observer has launched Wired City, a savvy new channel that explores the intersection of infrastructure, real estate, and broadband Internet. If you enjoy Betabeat’s coverage of New York’s quest for world domination, we think Wired City will be right up your alley.

Put simply, broadband Internet means high-speed Internet—in other words, anything that’s not that annoying dial-up connection you had around the dawn of the interwebs. It encompasses everything from DSL—which transmits information at a relatively slow six Mbps—to the much-desired fiber broadband, which transmits information at speeds up to 150 Mbps.

Full Article Here:

Via BetaBeat – The Lowdown on High Tech

City Council approves Hudson Square rezoning

Hudson Square

The City Council voted Wednesday to approve the rezoning of Hudson Square in Lower Manhattan. The rezoning will allow developers — including the area’s dominant player Trinity Real Estate — to move forward with several large-scale hotel and residential projects.

As part of the approval process, Speaker Christine Quinn secured a commitment for a vote on landmark status for the adjacent South Village Historic District, according to a statement from Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, a preservation group. But community activists were concerned that the city did not discuss any landmark designations for sites south of Houston Street, which is home to nearly half of the proposed district.

“The landmarking commitment only covers about half the endangered area and won’t take effect until nine months after the rezoning, allowing developers ample time to knock down historic buildings,” Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village group, said in a statement.

Earlier this month, two key council committees approved a controversial part of the proposal, which would let developers build 2,000 to 3,000 new apartments — many of them affordable — in the neighborhood. —Hiten Samtani

Architecture review: Tootsie Roll conversion brings welcome change to Soho

DDG’s 325 West Broadway will bring condos to former chocolate factory

March 21, 2013 03:30PM
By James Gardner

325 West Broadway project rendering

A particularly ugly part of West Broadway in Soho will soon become unimaginably better. The best thing that can be said for the existing structure at 325 West Broadway, at Grand Street, is that in the days when things were still manufactured in New York City it used to be a factory that produced Tootsie Rolls — those delicious, caramelized confections that we all remember from our younger days.

Now I yield to no one in my reverence for Tootsie Rolls, but that does not obscure the fact that the drab and unadorned building from which so much joy once issued is itself an eyesore, confected out of bare, albeit vaguely caramel-colored, brick.

All of that is about to change: the development firm of DDG has gotten the go-ahead from the Landmarks Preservation Commission to tear down the factory and put up a luxury condominium. DDG revealed new renderings for the project earlier this month. Standing nine stories plus a rooftop penthouse level, the building will have seven units ranging from 3,000 to 6,000 square feet.

The planned building, designed by DDG’s in-house architect Peter Guthrie, consists of a cubic structure clad in a pristine glass curtain wall, covered in a cast aluminum façade screen, with an elegant glass façade at street level, given over to retail and to the building’s lobby, the renderings show. (Beyhan Karahan Architects & Associates designed an earlier plan for the project.)

The results, to be completed in 2015, will look especially good when viewed beside the drab 19th century pile to its left, which could also profit from the strenuous ministrations of a developer.