Mortgage

Triggers for Rejection -Mortgages

The New York Times
By VICKIE ELMER
Published: October 6, 2011

“WE regret to inform you…” Nobody applying for a new mortgage or a refinancing wants to see or hear these words. But last year more than two million people were turned down for home loans, according to federal data, often because they didn’t meet certain lender requirements or because their applications were incomplete or otherwise problematic.

And that number, from the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council, doesn’t even include those who abandon the often-complicated mortgage qualification process. The Mortgage Bankers Association estimates that about half of those who try to refinance and 30 percent of buyers are either denied or drop out.

“A lot of people have credit banged up,” said Michael Fratantoni, the association’s vice president for research and economics.

Lenders’ underwriting criteria have become more rigorous in recent years; some banks have tightened up beyond federal requirements. Here are the six biggest triggers for rejection, according to industry experts.

INSUFFICIENT INCOME Lenders want to make sure you can afford to make the mortgage payments. Someone who earns, say, $40,000 a year need not bid on a $750,000 apartment, unless there’s a trust fund with quarterly payouts or other money available. Also, lenders typically look for at least a two-year track record of income, which could hurt those who may have switched jobs recently. “It’s common to get turned down if you have a gap in employment history over the last two years,” said Erin Lantz, the director of the Zillow Mortgage Marketplace, an online loan-matching service.

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Time Coming For Commercial Mortgage Market To Stand On Its Own

NEW YORK -(Dow Jones)- The Federal Reserve on Friday will conduct the last round of purchases of existing commercial mortgages, marking the end of a government program designed to buoy markets and boost investor confidence in securities that have been battered since the financial crisis in 2008.

The end of this part of the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility, or TALF, leaves a corner of the commercial mortgage market on its own, and investors won’t see new deals until later in the year, when regulators are expected to provide more clarity on securitization.

While the Fed’s role has been small relative to other programs–the central bank has granted only $11 billion in loan requests since last June–the impact has been much larger in a sector still in the throes of a painful correction.

“TALF provided psychological support for the market,” said Darrell Wheeler, head of commercial mortgages at Amherst Securities. “It served its purpose at the time it was needed.”

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By Prabha Natarajan Dow Jones Newswires