Fannie Mae

Loan limits on the rise for FHA, but not for Fannie and Freddie

FHA loans could become the go-to financing option for homebuyers in New York and New Jersey, but with higher fees.  By Kenneth R. Harney

After a year characterized by grumpy partisan gridlock, Congress came up with a Thanksgiving compromise that could change the mortgage choices of buyers and refinancers in more than 660 markets across the country: It raised maximum loan limits for the Federal Housing Administration while leaving loan ceilings untouched for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

In effect, this may make FHA the go-to financing option for borrowers needing loans up to $729,750 — with down payments as low as 3.5 percent — in New York, New Jersey, high-cost areas of California, metropolitan Washington, D.C., and scattered counties in other states, including Massachusetts, Florida and North Carolina. Fannie Mae- and Freddie Mac-eligible loans in those areas, meanwhile, stay capped at $625,500.

Equally important, the new plan raises the FHA ceilings for purchasers in hundreds of more moderately priced markets. In Hartford, Conn., the limit for FHA is now $440,000 — up from $320,850; Fannie and Freddie remain capped at $417,000. Seattle-area buyers’ maximum FHA loan amount jumped to $567,500, while the Fannie Mae-Freddie Mac ceiling remains at $506,000.

Full Article Here:

Freddie Mac Raises Bar for Refinancing With Home-Equity Debt

By Jody Shenn – Nov 15, 2011 5:22 PM ET

Nov. 15 (Bloomberg) — Freddie Mac, the government- supported mortgage company, made it harder for some borrowers with second-lien home equity debt to refinance as it released guidelines for its version of the federal Home Affordable Refinance Program.

For a borrower with loan-to-value ratio of less than 80 percent, the McLean, Virginia-based firm will require total housing debt, including second loans, of less than 105 percent of a property’s current values, according to a notice to lenders posted on its website. Previously, there was no cap.

“The rationale is to manage risk better,” Brad German, a spokesman, said in a telephone interview.

President Barack Obama has said he directed Freddie Mac and rival Fannie Mae to expand their HARP programs to help ease the U.S. housing slump and aid consumers. The companies, which were seized by the U.S. in 2008, are detailing the changes today, after they were announced Oct. 24.

Full Article Here

The Housing Helix Interview w/ Chris Williams of AIM Dashboard

Posted by Jonathan J. Miller

Today I speak with Chris Williams, President and Chief Technology Officer of AIMSdashboard,

“Williams is a 15-year veteran of the IT industry, having served stints with Cisco Systems and PolyServe, a software startup acquired by HP. At one time he was co-owner of Carolina Appraisers, a real estate appraisal firm based in Raleigh.”

AIMS stands for “appraisal independence management system,” and “dashboard” is a software term meaning a control panel housing two or more applications.

His venture was enabled by introduction of the May 1, 2009 agreement between Fannie Mae and NY Attorney General Andrew Cuomo known as the Home Valuation Code of Conduct.

AIMSdashboard is intended to help financial institutions take back control of the mortgage process through a software solution. Chris was very quick to point out that his company is a software company, NOT an appraisal management company, NOT an appraisal management company.

Helix Podcast Here:

The Going Gets Tougher – Fannie & Freddie Requirements

THOUGH the economy appears to be stabilizing, the market for financing remains tight.

THE MORTGAGE WARS Dr. Stephen Krieger and Dr. Nada Gligorov prevailed over a lender who didn’t like the size of their prospective building’s reserve fund.

By ELIZABETH A. HARRIS

Some people are able to get mortgages without much trouble, but others find the process arduous, mystifying and prolonged. Then there are the buyers who think their financing is secure, only to see it evaporate sometime between the signing of the contract and the closing table.

“Is it a problem? Yes, it’s a problem,” said Dottie Herman, the president of Prudential Douglas Elliman. “When these things fall through, it’s not because people are destitute — they have good incomes. It’s because banks are very, very tough now.”

Banks can be such sticklers that missing just one payment on a bill can result in a thumbs down. Change jobs and expect the microscope. To complicate matters, sometimes it is the buildings themselves, not the buyers, that fail to qualify, thanks to new or newly relevant Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac lending guidelines.

Continue to Full Article at NYTs