WTC

9/11 Memorial Takes Shape

DNAinfo Reporter/Producer

LOWER MANHATTAN — Six months from today, the long-awaited 9/11 memorial is scheduled to open for the first time.

Enormous waterfalls will flow into pools in the Twin Towers footprints. Nearly 300 trees will shade the cobblestone-paved memorial plaza. And the names of the nearly 3,000 attack victims will be inscribed on bronze parapets, memorialized for the first time at the site of the attacks.

But about 180 days before 9/11/11, the 8-acre memorial is still very much a construction site.

On a recent afternoon, workers laid stone tiles along the plaza, covering the complex infrastructure below. They also cleared sites for new trees, which are expected to arrive this spring. So far, more than 120 swamp white oak trees have been planted at the memorial, a number that is expected to more than double by September.

At the North Tower pool, bronze panels bearing the victims’ names already stretch halfway around the perimeter. The names are large and deeply grooved, and the smooth bronze glows when it catches sunlight.

The Port Authority tested the waterfall in the North Tower footprint last fall and expects to do a similar test in the South Tower pool in April, a spokesman said.

After the 10th anniversary ceremonies, the memorial will be open to the public seven days a week through a timed ticketing system. Construction will still continue all around the memorial on the other projects, including One World Trade Center, which recently reached the 58th floor. By September, the skyscraper will be about 80 stories tall.

“Signs of progress are everywhere,” Port Authority Executive Director Chris Ward said in a statement. “But there is much left to do and challenges ahead so we can’t let up. We must continue to keep our heads down and zeroed in on delivering on the commitment we made to open the 9/11 memorial on the 10-year anniversary.”

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LMDC Approves $20 Million for W. Thames Pedestrian Bridge

BPCA, which oversaw design process, will manage construction

Lower Manhattan residents who can’t avoid crossing West Street in the vicinity of the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel got an early Christmas present at the Monday board meeting of the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation (LMDC), which approved more than $20 million in funding for the long-requested, much-delayed pedestrian bridge over West Thames Street.

“This is terrific news,” said Community Board 1 (CB1) chair Julie Menin, who also serves on the LMDC board. Ms. Menin led the fight earlier this year to have more than $200 million of federal funding, originally allocated to the LMDC to defray the cost of utility reconstruction Downtown, redirected to what she calls “critically important, worthy projects for the residents of this community.” She cites the West Thames pedestrian bridge — a design for which was unveiled in June 2009, only to have the Bloomberg administration cut funding for the project a few months later — as one example of the kind of project that will be funded by this money.

State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver said in a statement, “after a year of leading the effort to build a pedestrian bridge at West Thames Street, I am extremely pleased that we have succeeded in getting the funding approved. Improving safety along dangerous intersections at West Street has been a top priority for me and this latest decision is one that could well save lives. With the successful opening of PS 276 this past September, children and their parents will now have a safe and reliable way to cross over West Street at an intersection that sees heavy traffic, particularly trucks and other large vehicles coming and going from the World Trade Center site.”

Full Article Here: via The Broadsheet Daily

Church Destroyed on 9/11 May Sue Port Authority

Greek Orthodox Church Destroyed on 9/11 May Sue for Right to Rebuild

Archbishop Demetrios, second from the left, led a service in honor of the St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church at Ground Zero in 2006. The archbishop will return to the site for another service this Sunday. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

 

By Julie Shapiro  DNAinfo Reporter/Producer

LOWER MANHATTAN — The St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, destroyed on 9/11, may sue the Port Authority for the right to rebuild their house of worship, a church spokesman said Friday.

Negotiations over how and where to rebuild the Cedar Street church stalled nearly two years ago, and the two sides have not spoken since.

In the meantime, the Port Authority has commandeered the church’s land to build an underground parking garage and loading dock for the World Trade Center.

“The site of St. Nicholas, which is the property of the church, has been used by the Port Authority for over a year, and we never authorized them to do that,” said Mark Arey, spokesman for the church. “The Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America has looked at legal [action] very seriously.”

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WTC’s Remake Advances

By ANTON TROIANOVSKI And ELIOT BROWN

One year and one day from now, after years of sometimes anguishing delay and controversy, the World Trade Center memorial will be dedicated.

But then what?

While organizers are finally on track to open the memorial by the 10th anniversary of the terrorist attack, they haven’t figured out the logistics for opening it up to the public afterward.

Challenges are manifold. The memorial, after all, is in one of the country’s biggest construction sites and what was in the past a prime terrorism target. During construction, the skyscrapers and other buildings rising on three sides will pose a safety risk for the millions of visitors who are expected to visit.

A wide number of other issues also aren’t resolved, from how visitors to the memorial will be screened to where the scores of tour buses will be parked. “It’s a matter of figuring out, within all this heavy construction, how do you get people onto the site safely and off the site safely?” said Joe Daniels, president of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, in an interview. “We don’t have all the answers yet.”

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Conde Nast to 1 World Trade Center

A 2006 rendering of the Freedom Tower. It is now known as 1 World Trade Center.

Condé Nast’s decision in 1996 to move its headquarters, chic magazines and black-clad editors to Times Square proved to be a transformative moment for a still rough-and-tumble district shunned by many New Yorkers.
Reuters, Ernst & Young, “Good Morning America” on ABC and millions of tourists soon followed the media company’s path, pushing aside the pornographic shops, prostitutes and hustlers who once dominated a neighborhood known as the crossroads of the world.

Fourteen years later, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is hoping that Condé Nast can work that kind of magic downtown. On Tuesday, the authority signed a tentative deal to move the Condé Nast headquarters to 1 World Trade Center, the 1,776-foot skyscraper now under construction at ground zero. That would make it the building’s largest private tenant so far and one with trend-setting cachet to boot.

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Trade Center Financing Rift Still Wide as Deadline Nears

With a deadline approaching, the Port Authority and the developer Larry A. Silverstein have so far been unable to resolve their longstanding differences for rebuilding ground zero, with the authority getting a chilly reception to its latest proposal.

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is already building 1 World Trade Center, a $3 billion, 1,776-foot-tall skyscraper formerly called the Freedom (more…)