Author: NY Living Solutions

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531 Manhattan Ave – Two Family Townhome for Sale

531 Manhattan Ave – Two Family Townhome for Sale

This Harlem Townhome is located just East of Morningside Park and a short walk to Columbia University. This highly desirable location, is home to a well maintained Two-Family.

2nd, 3rd & 4th Floor Triplex: Features – Two Bed / Three Bathrooms, Kitchen, Living Room, Den/Home Office, Three Fireplaces (One on each floor) and two Skylights on the top Floor. This space currently has the only access to the garden, via a spiral staircase off the den.

Garden Level: One Bedroom & One Bathroom features Large Living Room with Open Kitchen, Generous Bedroom with a walk-in closet. Ceiling fans located in the living room and bedroom. The bedroom in the rear of the unit has two west facing windows with garden views. This unit currently has no access to the garden.

Basement: Laundry space for the one bedroom tenant, plenty of dry storage space. This area houses all of the properties Mechanicals: Boiler, Water Tanks (2), and Separate Electric & Water Meters.

Lot Size: 15×80
Building Size: 15×55 – Approx. 4100Sf including basement
Building Can Be Delivered Vacant.
Currently Configured: Triplex (2Bed/3Bath) & One Bedroom (1Bed/1Bath)
Steps to fine restaurants, reputable jazz clubs, shopping centers, bookstores and movie theaters.
Transportation: A, C, D & B @ 125th Street MTA Stop & M60 Bus to
LaGuardia Airport – 2 Blocks Away
Low Taxes

$2,500,000 FOR SALE
4,100 ft²$609 per ft²7 rooms 3 beds3 baths

 

Airbnb Slows Hiring Overseas, Shifts Strategy

Fast-Growing Online Rental Service Is Trying Not to Move Too Quickly Abroad

Airbnb Inc. is trying to avoid becoming another cautionary tale in international expansion.

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Airbnb, which is run by CEO Brian Chesky, will centralize certain services in a yet-to-be named European hub.

One of technology’s hottest startups, with a valuation of $2.5 billion, the online-accommodation rental service has recently slowed down hiring in its international operation, according to several people with direct knowledge of the matter.

Airbnb, which has about 600 employees world-wide, has also shifted its strategy abroad. The company is assigning scores of employees to new roles and moving to centralize certain services in a yet-to-be announced European hub, these people added.

As a result, several employees—less than a dozen—have decided to leave the company, the company said. The creation of the hub, which may be set up in Dublin, one person said, will require relocation for some employees. Meanwhile, the changes in responsibilities will also require additional training.

A company spokeswoman confirmed the changes to its international strategy and added that it hasn’t made any layoffs in connection with these changes. She declined to comment on plans for a new European hub.

Pressing on the international brakes might seem counter intuitive for the five-year-old San Francisco based startup—a business that is now more global than domestic. But Airbnb and its chief executive, Brian Chesky, is trying to avoid the pitfalls that have befallen other highflying tech companies, like Groupon Inc., GRPN -1.54% which grew hyper-fast abroad early on but faced major difficulties after going public.

Full Article Here:

Via The WSJ

7-Eleven Goes High-Tech – FiDi

 7-Eleven has gone high-tech.

New Lower Manhattan 7-Eleven

The chain’s expansive new Financial District outpost, which sits at the corner of John and Pearl streets, boasts touch-screen ordering, free Wi-Fi, a huge flat-screen TV and even an Amazon Locker — a kiosk where Amazon customers can pick up their online-ordered goods.

The new 7-Eleven opened last week —  just in time to celebrate the chain’s annual “Free Slurpee Day” on July 11 — and looks more like a cafe than a convenience store, with enough space to seat about 25 people.

The Stack: NYC First Prefabricated Building

INWOOD — One of the city’s first prefabricated residential building to come to Inwood is near completion.

The Stack, a 38,000-square-foot, seven-story concrete and steel building, was shipped to 4857 Broadway in 56 separate modules. Placement of the modules started in late June and will be completed Wednesday by an eight-person crew and one crane.

Full Article Here:

Via DNAinfo New York

Introducing Wired City, a New Channel Where Commercial Real Estate and Broadband Come Together

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New York City is inching ever closer to rival Silicon Valley as the epicenter of the tech world—and commercial real estate has to match its pace. With more tech start-ups moving to New York, and requiring high-speed Internet to do their jobs—or at least watch cat videos with minimal buffering—the presence of a broadband Internet connection can transform a pedestrian property into a hot commodity.

That’s why fellow Observer Media property The Commercial Observer has launched Wired City, a savvy new channel that explores the intersection of infrastructure, real estate, and broadband Internet. If you enjoy Betabeat’s coverage of New York’s quest for world domination, we think Wired City will be right up your alley.

Put simply, broadband Internet means high-speed Internet—in other words, anything that’s not that annoying dial-up connection you had around the dawn of the interwebs. It encompasses everything from DSL—which transmits information at a relatively slow six Mbps—to the much-desired fiber broadband, which transmits information at speeds up to 150 Mbps.

Full Article Here:

Via BetaBeat – The Lowdown on High Tech

City Council approves Hudson Square rezoning

Hudson Square

The City Council voted Wednesday to approve the rezoning of Hudson Square in Lower Manhattan. The rezoning will allow developers — including the area’s dominant player Trinity Real Estate — to move forward with several large-scale hotel and residential projects.

As part of the approval process, Speaker Christine Quinn secured a commitment for a vote on landmark status for the adjacent South Village Historic District, according to a statement from Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, a preservation group. But community activists were concerned that the city did not discuss any landmark designations for sites south of Houston Street, which is home to nearly half of the proposed district.

“The landmarking commitment only covers about half the endangered area and won’t take effect until nine months after the rezoning, allowing developers ample time to knock down historic buildings,” Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village group, said in a statement.

Earlier this month, two key council committees approved a controversial part of the proposal, which would let developers build 2,000 to 3,000 new apartments — many of them affordable — in the neighborhood. —Hiten Samtani

Domino developer promises bikes, yoga, veggies, books

By Danielle Furfaro via The Brooklyn Paper
Courtesy of Two Trees Management Company
This is what Jed Walentas wants to build on the Domino Sugar factory site.

Here’s one way for a developer to ingratiate himself with the new neighbors.

Jed Walentas, the new owner of the Domino Sugar factory, will temporarily hand over a football-field-sized lot on his massive Williamsburg site for use as an urban farm, bike course, yoga studio, and reading room until the builder gets around to developing the property.

The east end of the Kent Avenue lot between S. Third and S. Fourth streets will be run by community space guru Bobby Redd and will include an all-weather reading room, a community farm headed by North Brooklyn Farms and a green space that will be used for activities including yoga, aerobics, and public events.

“We plan to establish a community green space where all are welcome,” said Redd. “We have had immense success working with the Bushwick community over the past 14 months and we look forward to working together with our new neighbors in South Williamsburg.”

The west side of the lot, which will be run by Jessica Kocher of Ride Brooklyn, will include a practice cycling space for young riders, beginner and intermediate bike tracks, and a pump track, which is a small course set up with bumps, jumps, and berms.

Volunteers from the New York City Mountain Bike Association will oversee the courses, and Kocher said she hopes to get a handful of loaner bikes for children and possibly adults.

“The purpose of this is to have a place to mountain bike in Brooklyn,” said Kocher, who lamented the fact that Brooklyn is the only borough without mountain bike trails. “Personally, we wanted a place to ride.”

Redd and Kocher submitted separate proposals, but Walentas’s company, Two Trees Management Co., merged them together, creating an urban utopia for the fixed-gear, organic-dining set.

“We married them,” said Dave Lombino, director of special projects at Two Trees.

Two months ago, Two Trees announced it was searching for operators to take over the space across the street from the main refinery building while it pushed its new plans through the city’s land-use review process.

Two Trees will not charge the interim operators rent, said Lombino, but they will pay utilities.

The initial agreement with the operators is for one year, and it could be extended, depending on how long it takes Two Trees to get approval and finish the site design.

Walentas has said the company wants to build on the Kent Street lot first, but Lombino said ground will not be broken until late 2014 at the earliest.

“For us, it’s silly to have this site fenced off from the community,” said Lombino. “We want to signal to the community that we are creative and ambitious.”